How to Harvest Rainwater and Build a Beautiful Landscape

New year, new rain.  It has been a wet start for California in 2019.  Since the start of the year, several strong storms have hit the state, each bringing some serious amount of rainwater.  As a result, the majority of the state is no longer in some dryness conditions it was in before.  In the year’s first snow survey conducted on Jan 3, the snowpack water content  was  67% of average;  4 weeks later, in the second survey conducted on Jan 31, it jumped to 125% thanks to all the storms.   In a dry place like California, all these rains spell joy for everyone.  With the memory of the last mega drought still fresh on everyone’s mind, it is natural to ask: how can we best deal with all this water?  Just let it run away, or harvest it and reuse it, e.g., to build a rain landscape?

much storms Since begin of the year

Since the new year starts, storms kept coming to California.  On 1/16, one of the strongest storms pounded northern California for 3 days, bringing in 1-5 inches of rain for many places.  The city of San Jose received 1.36 inches.

Just 2 weeks later, another storm pummeled the area for 4 days, with San Jose receiving 1.9 inches.   At this point , “Rainfall totals across Northern California continue to creep closer to average for this time of year. Through Sunday at 6 p.m., rainfall totals for the water year which began Oct. 1 include Redding at 21.24 inches (109 percent of normal), Santa Rosa at 19.23 inches (90 percent), San Francisco 12.22 inches (88 percent), Oakland 9.42 inches (81 percent) and San Jose 7.42 inches (87 percent).”

This time, the storm not only brought rain, but also snow to the peaks in the area.  “A “very cold air mass” lowered snow levels to only about 1000 feet in the San Francisco bay area, having all the major peaks  covered in snow on Feb 5 morning.  Last time this happened was 1976.  Here, you can see Mt. Umumhum in the Santa Cruz Mountain range covered in snow.

Snow on Mt Humuhum
Snow on Mt Umumhum in Santa Cruz mountain range

For most of us, while we enjoy the rains, sometimes it  can also spell some inconveniences.  Some roofs might leak.  Water pools under the downspout, which can be damaging for the base of the house.  Roads full of water that makes driving hard.

water from downspout

Most of the infrastructures in place are indeed designed to send the rainwater out as soon as possible.  Rainwater runoff flows down streets, into storm drains and then right out to the creek and ocean.  However, is this the right thing to do?

rainwater runoff

Rain Water is Critical for Water Supply and the Environment

Rain water is basically clean water that falls right on every household’s roof.  Many times, it is not just a trivial amount – can be quite a bit.  For a house in San Jose with a roof of 1000 sq ft,  the 1.9 inches of rain that it received in last storm translates to  1184 gallons of water.   If we use the state’s average water use of 63 gallons per person per day,  the water is enough for a person’s use of 19 days. with just one storm’s water on one roof.

If we use the 7.42 inches that San Jose has received since the beginning of the water year (10/1/2018), then the roof has received 4625 gallons, enough for 73 days or about 2 and a half month’s use.

As we can see in the photo above, this much water just went down the drain and was gone.  If we add all the roofs’ rainwater together, for the whole city, and the area, the amount of rainwater that goes out this way is a gigantic number.  What impact does it have on the environment when so much rain water goes away instantly?

Loss of fresh water

Rain water is fresh water delivered to every household without any transportation.  The water can be used for irrigation, or other daily needs if properly treated and meeting certain hygiene standard.  In comparison, a big part of the city water we use is delivered to us over mountains, plains and across hundreds of miles, or even longer.  A big chunk of tap water in the coastal cities comes from Sierra Navada range in the east of the state.  By turning the rainwater away instantly, we lose much water that can otherwise be used.   California is a dry place, such a loss of water is a waste we can not afford.

Depletion of underground water

Groundwater is the water present beneath Earth‘s surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of rock formations. (Wikepedia)

Groundwater is an important source of our water.  “Groundwater provides the largest source of usable water storage in the United States, and California annually withdraws the largest amount of groundwater of all the states.”  (Wikipedia) In California, “On average, underground aquifers provide nearly 40% of the water used by California’s farms and cities, and significantly more in dry years.”  We depend on the ground water for our water supply; unfortunately, due to heavy pumping, some water basins have been “critically overdrafted.”

“Groundwater supplies are replenished, or recharged, by rain and snow melt that seeps down into the cracks and crevices beneath the land’s surface. ”  In cities, with the prevalence of impervious surfaces such as rooftops and driveways, rainwater runs off, instead of falling on the soil underneath those surfaces, depriving the soil the recharging.

Just last week, it was reported that due to the overpumping during the historic drought from 2012-2016, a California town sank over 2 feet in 9 years.  If we want to secure  a future with stable water supply,  it is of utmost importance that we recharge the groundwater now.

rainwater runoff on a road

Pollution to Waterway

As it flows through the surface of the city, stormwater runoff collects all kinds of pollutants such as motor oil, gas, chemicals, fertilizers, pesticides, etc.  As the stormwater is discharged into the waterways untreated, the toxic substances can pollute the water and harm birds, fishes and other aquatic life that live there.

Risk of flash flood, mudslide and erosion

During storms, a large amount of stormwater can gather and join force, flow down slopes,  fill freeways and roads, and flood lower places. Here, after the storm on Jan 16, a city was working to take water out from its storm water system to prevent flooding.

flood prevention

In the same storm, after heavy rains hit the Santa Cruz mountain area,  a mudslide happened on southbound highway 17, forcing the closure of all lanes.  In southern California, evacuation orders were issued to communities in LA County and Santa Barbary country  for the high risk of flash flood.

2 years ago in  May 17, a debris slide at the Monterrey section of Pacific Coast Highway (highway 1) was so massive that it forced the highway to close for more than 1 year, before it finally reopened in June 18.   Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) is world famous with its majestic views for the pacific ocean.  The long closure had a pretty big impact on the area’s tourism.  Here, the Bixby bridge could not be crossed through for a year due to the PCH’s closure.

Photo credit: Dave Lastovskiy

Harvesting Rain with a Rain Garden

As the rain water is so critical for us, for our water supply and environment, we should harvest it for a good use, instead of letting it runaway.

There are several ways to harvest rainwater.  One is to install rain barrels or cistern.   The rainwater can be collected and stored in the barrels or cisterns; which can be taken out for irrigation later.

Another way is to build a rain garden.  As EPA defines it: “A rain garden is a depressed area in the landscape that collects rain water from a roof, driveway or street and allows it to soak into the ground. Planted with grasses and flowering perennials, rain gardens can be a cost effective and beautiful way to reduce runoff from your property. Rain gardens can also help filter out pollutants in runoff and provide food and shelter for butterflies, song birds and other wildlife.”

Here we are going to use 2 rain gardens that were just finished to illustrate how they were built.   When the owners first planned a garden project for their house, they just wanted to build some veggie beds in the backyard so they could grow veggies.  However, at the site review, after everyone looked at where the downspouts were and how the rainwater was sent and not used, it became clear that these were good opportunities to capture the rainwater with rain landscapes.

How to build a rain garden

While rain gardens have different looks and shapes and may serve slightly different functions depending on the locations they are in, some basic steps to make them are pretty much the same.  Here are the major steps in building a rain garden for a residential house.

First, Find out where the downspout is and where the water flows  to, and identify a good location for  the rain garden.  The soil at the location should absorb water well.  If not sure, take a water test: dig a hole of 6 inches, fill  in water to full, then see how long it takes for the water to soak down.  If it takes more than 12 hours, consider another location.

In the front,  the downspout is located right next to the yard.  While all the rainwater would go into soil, which was good, it could be further diverted out and flow to a rain garden, allowing soil soaking for a bigger area.

front yard

Second, outline the water channel and the rain garden.  It can be a circle, an oval, a peanut, or a kidney – shapes of curvy lines.  Here is the outline for the rain garden in the front yard.

front yard rain garden

Lastly, install the rain garden.  Dig out the depression along the shape defined, add a layer of soil that is comprised of compost and coarse sand, then put in plants which are rain garden appropriate – can stand both wet and dry conditions well.   After all is done, for a nice touch, add some pebbles on top, which help filter out debris in the rainwater, and give the garden a nice look.

front yard rain garden

front yard rain garden

Around rain garden, some more plants were added.  Most were California native plants. There are several big advantages for planting native versus non-native..  First, it saves water.  Native plants only need a fraction of water compared with non-natives after they are established; second, as the native plants have been the food for local insects and pollinators, they provide a far stronger support for  the local eco system.

California native plant

Along the edge, a row of lavenders were planted, adding much charm to the garden.  Here is the old front yard, and the new yard with the rain landscape:

front yard rain landscape

In the backyard, a downspout pointed right at the drainage so the rainwater was lost right a away.  In the project,  a pipe was connected and the water was piped out to a corner away from the house, where it can soak down to the soil.

backyard

 

backyard rain garden

 

In this blog post the process is explained in more detail.

You can also take a look at this video.

Rain gardens Examples

Here is another example for rain garden.  The downspout comes down to the front yard, with all the rainwater soaking the small area close to the house.  After the rain garden was built, water was diverted to this depression, making a nice rain landscape.

rain garden

This is another project with a rain garden.  There are two downspouts one each side.  Before the rain garden was built, rainwater just soaked the area or flew down driveway.   After the garden, both downspouts’ rain water are captured and diverted further.  This was how the garden was built:

rain garden

With all the storms this year, the garden comes out to look great.  This is how it looks after a strong storm:

rain garden after rain

 

rain garden after rain

rain garden after rain

Santa Clara Water District Rain Harvesting Rebate Program

From 2019, Santa Clara Water District started a “Rainwater Capture Rebate Program“, adding to the original “Landscape Conversion Rebate Program”.  On its website, the district says:

“We are pleased to announce our new Rainwater Capture Rebates starting January 1, 2019! Rainwater capture, also know as rainwater harvesting, can be used as an alternative water source, reducing demands on our treated water supply and replenishing our underground aquifers. Keeping rainwater onsite also serves an important role in reducing stormwater runoff that can lead to erosion, flooding, and pollution of our creeks and streams. Through our Landscape Rebate Program online application process, residents and business owners can apply to:

  • Receive a rebate up to $35 per qualifying rain barrel installed to collect rainwater from existing downspouts,
  • Receive a rebate of $0.50 per gallon for diverting existing downspouts to qualifying cisterns, and
  • Receive a rebate of $1 per square foot of roof area diverted (up to $300 per site) into an installed rain garden to collect roof water runoff.

Projects that have been started or projects that have already been completed prior to application approval are not eligible.”

In summary, rainwater is a resource too valuable to lose.  We should  harvest as much of it as we can.  Install a rain barrel, or build a rain garden: it will go a long way to saving water, protecting our environment, as well as giving you beautiful landscapes right around your home.

 

 

 

 

Bees love them, they are planted heavily around the Apple campus

Last year, 5 years after Apple’s legendary co-founder Steve Jobs unveiled the “spaceship” design for the new Apple campus, the project finally finished and the new campus started its use.  While the huge spaceship is undoubtedly the most striking element of the campus, there is another equally important yet less known feature.

It is this massive amount of plants planted on the campus, which fills out the 3 acre space – 9000 trees, and countless California native and other drought tolerant plants.

It is not something that just happened that way – it is by design.  When Steve Jobs was planning the campus, from the very beginning he was very adamant that it should just be like what Silicon Valley was  before the digital transformation.  As Steven Levy of Backchannel said,  Jobs “wanted to create a microcosm of Silicon Valley, a landscape reenactment of the days when the cradle of digital disruption had more fruit trees than engineers. In one sense, the building would be an ecological preservation project; in another sense, it’d be a roman a clef written in soil, bark, and blossom.”  Today the campus fulfills that vision.  Inside and outside, the space is fully filled with trees and shrubs, many of them California natives.

A plant that grow in abundance on the campus is California Lilac.  On an early morning in March, a stroll along the campus could find that some of the lilacs grew to be big bushes already in less than one year’s time.   They are blooming, with massive bright blue blossom.

Native plants around Apple campus

Native plants around Apple campus 2

Close up, you will see some small creatures busy at work.

A bee on a lilac

A bee on a lilac 2

Bees at work

The bees were busy collecting pollens, which is their food.  Look at the two small yellow balls – they sure have collected quite a bit of pollen!

When the bees flying from flowers to flowers collecting their pollens, they rub pollens from a flower onto another, pollinating the flowers, which enables fertilization and turns the flowers into fruits. As most flowers need pollination to grow into fruits, without these small creatures, we can’t enjoy a lot of the fruits we are so accustomed to having every day.

Look around us – from the apple we ate in the morning, to the jeans we wear (cotton), and blueberries we snacked on in the afternoon, they all have bees to thank for.  Bees pollinate 75% of world’s main crops.  According to USDA, bees pollinate an estimated $15 billion or more of American crops per year. It is hard to imagine a world without the bees pollinating all those crops!

A bee on a lilac 3

Bees on a decline

Unfortunately, in the last several decades, bees have been on a decline. According to a study by Center for Biological Diversity (author Kelsey Kopec, a pollinator researcher):

  • “Among native bee species with sufficient data to assess (1,437), more than half (749) are declining.
  • Nearly 1 in 4 (347 native bee species) is imperiled and at increasing risk of extinction.”

For one of the wild bees, the rusty patched bumble bee, its population has declined by so much (almost 90%) since 1990s that U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed it as an endangered species in early 2017.  The bee became first wild bee in the continental United States to be listed as endangered species.

Why such decline?  In the same study, the author indicated that “A primary driver of these declines is agricultural intensification, which includes habitat destruction and pesticide use. Other major threats are climate change and urbanization.”

Loss of habitat is one of the top reasons for loss of bees, which makes total sense.  The bees have been feeding on the plants in their native land for hundreds of thousands of years; when the habitats are lost to farming or industrialization, the plants are gone, so are the bees.

Native plants for bees

Bees need flowers’ nectar and pollen for their food; they especially like those from native plants, which is something that they have been feeding on for hundreds of thousands of years.  The California Lilac seen here at the Apple campus, is a big California native, and a favorite for bees with its dense blue blossom.  Lilac can bloom from late spring to summer, providing a good 4-5 months of food to the bees.

Another big native plant, the state flower, California Golden Poppy, also attract bees when they bloom.

Golden poppy on a field

Golden Poppy

Seaside Daisy, and Yarrow, heavily planted around the Apple campus, are two other natives that bees love.

Seaside Daisy

Apple Park 3

Plant more natives, restore the habitat

As bees play such a critical role for the ecosystem we live in, and for our food and agriculture business, we should do everything we can to provide them a good environment, putting them back onto a path for healthy growth. One critical step to achieve this is plant more native and other pollinator friendly plants.

Apple has done this by planting massive amounts of native plants on its campus; Many city parks and nature reserves also use their vast spaces for the purpose.  Here you can see California Lilac in a city park and a nature reserve in the San Francisco Bay area.  These are all great examples, but we can do more.

Lilac in a park
California Lilac in a city park
California Lilac in a nature reserve. See the bees on the blue blossom

In the last several decades, lawns have become the dominate landscapes for most single family residences in the country. People now realize, lawns not only consume a lot of water – over half of the water is used for outdoor watering in California, but also contribute to the loss of habitats for bees and other pollinators.  The stretch after stretch of green provides hardly any food or shelter for the bees.

By replacing lawns with native and other bee friendly plants, we can gradually put back the habitats that were lost, piece by piece.  We can help restore the habitats, starting from our own house.

The owner of this place wanted to replace their back yard with something much more attractive.  They decided to put in drought tolerant landscapes, and applied for Santa Clara Water District’s Landscape Conversion Rebate Program.  During the project, when they saw a lilac, they wanted it for their garden right away.  The project was finished quickly and they received the rebate promptly.  Now, they can enjoy the lovely garden, and the striking beauty the lilac provides.  Bees surely will love the new lilac too!

This garden is filled with California natives.  It was installed in fall, by next spring the bloom was already full on, with bees busy feasting on the Golden Poppy, Buckwheat and Matilijia Poppy. On a day in summer, while the poppy was already near its end of the bloom, a bee could still be seen working on it.

A garden with native plants

By putting in a garden with lots of California natives and other drought tolerant plants, not only can you save a lot of water, but provide a habitat for the bees and other pollinators, which in turn can help build a more sustainable environment.   Spring is a great time for planting.  Start today, and see native plants’ bloom and bees tomorrow!

Capture Every Raindrop In Your Garden

After a long dry winter rains finally came!  For three days the rains just came down heavily.  This garden was completed right before the rains. During the rain, raindrops can be seen coming down from the two down spouts, going right into the the soil of the garden.  The plants waved gently in the rain, as if saying: “Thank you!”

Water Efficient Garden in rain

downspout in rain

Before – brown lawns

The owner has been at this place for some time.  Ever since he moved here, he had not done anything to the front and back yards.  The lawns went brown during the drought, looking quite barren.   Even after the very wet year of 2017, they did not come back.  Finally, when the owner heard about the Santa Clara Landscape Rebate Program in his city, he decided it was the time to start doing something.

He wanted to build a garden that will meet all the requirements of the rebate program.  After he did some searches online, he found the website of Water Efficient Garden, where he got exactly the information he needed.

Brown Lawn

In the backyard  there is an olive tree.  It is a large tree with lots of black olives lying on the ground.

Olive tree

Designing the Garden

The owner wanted to have a simple and easy conversion which would meet all the requirements of the Rebate Program.  Luckily, there are  a large number of attractive drought tolerant plants to choose from.  When selected carefully, even just with a few, the plants can make an elegant and water efficient garden.

In Mediterranean areas like Spain where the olive trees originate from, the tree can be seen everywhere: in the open fields, at the hill tops, etc.  There, lavender, rosemary, and other Mediterranean natives also grow in abundance.  They are well adapted to the climate there, very drought tolerant, yet with attractive flowers and aroma.

California shares the same Mediterranean climate, so these plants also do well here.  For the backyard design, it was decided some of these plants will be used, keeping the Mediterranean vibe alive.

Olive tree in Spain
An olive tree on top of a hill at Barcelona
Capture every drop in the garden

The front yard sits next to the side of the house, with thick bushes almost completely blocking out the wall.  When the project started, the grasses were removed, the bushes cut, exposing the wall.   On it there are two down spouts, pointing to the yard below (only one is shown in this photo).  So, when it rains, all the rainwater from the roof will go into the yard, not driveway or other impervious surfaces, which is excellent.

After the historical drought that ended just last year,  people all realize now how valuable water really is.  With population increase and climate change, our demand for water will only increase.  On the other hand, as the Sierra Nevada snowpack will “very likely” shrink  by 30% in the next 20 years, the supply will decrease.  How can we have enough water to meet our demand?

A big chunk of water do come to us every year, but in the past we send a large part of it away right away – the rain water.  Rainwater is not a waste, but a very valuable resource of water.   Steven Moore, a member of the State Water Resources Control Board, said, “Stormwater could be a significant addition to California’s water supply. Los Angeles estimates that rainfall could provide nearly half a million acre-feet (620 million cubic meters) per year. Stormwater could make a difference, it could see us through seven years of drought instead of five.”

If the rain water is directed to impervious surfaces like driveway, the water will just become runoff and be sent right away, which is a waste for this valuable water resource.   In places with natural ground cover, 50% of the rain water can go back in the soil.  In urban areas where a big chunk of surfaces are impervious,  only about 15% of water goes back.  Specifically, only 5% of the water infiltrates deep down, versus 25% with natural ground cover, which seriously deprives the ground from water recharging that is badly needed.

So, when it rains, we should direct as much water as possible to our garden, let it water the plants, soak into the soil, and recharge the ground water.   By capturing every drop, we can make the best use of the water that fall on our roof every year.

After – drought tolerant landscape

The garden projects are done!  This is how the front yard looks now:

To further absorb the rainwater, a small ditch was made in the middle of the garden.  Filled with pebble stones, the “river” can take all the rain water coming down the two down sprouts when it rains.  In addition to capturing the rain water,  it adds a vivid element to the landscape, making it look more lively and appealing.   The rocks scattering across the garden add yet more textures and balance out the “river” in the middle.

All the plants are drought tolerant. They sport pink, purple, yellow and white blossoms, making the garden not just water efficient, but also cheerful.

For the backyard, in front of the Olive tree, another Mediterranean native  – the lavenders, add color and aroma.

a water efficient garden

Close to the patio, a native plant from California flank the pathway with their tiny blue blossom and dark green leaves.

California native plant

Irrigation controller and drip irrigation was done for all the plants.  In addition, a rain sensor was also installed, which is connected to the irrigation controller.  When it rains, the rain sensor will send signal to the controller, which will delay the irrigation scheduled until the rain stops.  A simple device can save even more water for the garden.

How does it do in the rain?

Right after the garden was installed, a much-waited-for rain came.  For 3 days rain kept pouring down.  How did the garden do?

Very well.  While the rain that fell on the driveway inevitably runs off,  every drop of the rain that fell on the roof all went into the garden from the two down spouts.  Plants love the rain water, which is not  treated with chemicals, as is the case for in-house water.  Plants grown up with rain water usually grow faster, stronger, and have better and larger blossom.

After the project was finished,  information such as garden photos were submitted to the Rebate Program, which issued a rebate promptly.

By converting a brown lawn into a water efficient garden, the space looks much more appealing.  In a dry place like California, it can save 30-60%  of water comparing with a lawn, saving cost and maintenance work.  On top of it, when it rains, it can absorb every drop of the rain water, feeding the plants, and saving even more water.  For all these these great benefits, you can receive a rebate of $1-$2 per square foot.

The owner was happy with the project.  “It looks very good.  We are really happy with the design. ”

We are not receiving the average level of rain this year;  it looks we are going to have another dry year.   We’ve got to be prepared for the dry time now.  Why wait?  Start today!

lawn to water efficient garden conversion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Brown to Floral Dream

“I want to get rid of the brown lawn, like yesterday!  and I want a garden of flowers!  ” declared Sheena (not the real name), the owner of the house and a mom of young girls.

lawn2watereffigarden

 

The brown lawn had been an eye sore to Sheena for a long time.  Like so many other Californians, she stopped watering the lawn when the state implemented the drought Emergency Regulation.  The lawn turned brown and did not look good.  Sheena wanted to do something about it, but had no clue where to start.  When she was told about the Santa Clara Landscape Conversion Rebate Program, she could not wait to get onboard.

Designing the Garden

Sheena wanted a garden of flowers boasting of strong, festival colors, like red, purple, and orange.  “It’s a garden for my princesses!”  She also likes different types of grasses as nice decorations.

Plants of Beautiful Flowers

It is a blessing that many drought tolerant plants do have very beautiful flowers.  It was quite easy to pick the plants that Sheena wanted from a big collection.

Mexican Bush Sage:  With its big volume of bright purple blossom (with some white blended in), it is the kind of plants that you will notice right away.   Drought tolerant once established, it blooms for a long time from summer to late fall, providing incessant color and beauty to your garden.

img_0459

Lion’s Tail: brings a festival feel.

lions-tail-2

New Zealand Flax:

img_0464

Red Hot Poker

red-hot-poker-2

Erigeron:  Tough, drought tolerant, pretty blossom.

erigeron

Mulch

Mulch is a must for any water efficient garden.   After all the plants are planted, a layer of mulch is placed on the surface to 1) keep the soil moist and 2)reduce evaporation.  Mulch can reduce evaporation by as much as 75%, so is a very important element for any garden that aims to conserve water.

Organic mulch such as chipped bark is a good choice.  In addition to keeping the water in soil, they can add to the soil’s richness once composed.  This is critical for the health of the soil and the growth of the plants.

There are different colors of mulch, and the choice was easy for Sheena. The garden is already filled with flowers of all pretty colors, with the mulch, it is further enhanced to this other level of prettiness and excitement.

Rain Sensor

A rain sensor and automatic controller were also installed with the garden. When it rains, the sensor can send the signal to the controller, which will delay the watering scheduled, saving irrigation water for the garden.  Rain sensor is another great way to make a garden water efficient.

img_0445

The project was finished within a week, and the total cost was less than $3000.  The rebate made it substantially lower.

Sheena was very happy.  “My princesses like the garden!”  Sheena is glad now the brown lawn is gone, and she and her princesses have this big beautiful view to enjoy everyday.  In addition, “It saves me a lot of money. We use much less water now, and no longer need to hire hands for maintenance.”

 

waterefficientgarden1

 

From Brown to California Native Charm

The brown lawn has been an eye sore to the owner of the house for quite a while.  He had been wanting to replace it with something more beautiful, but did not know where to start.   Since California’s drought five years ago, he put in his effort to conserve water, turning off the sprinklers. Sure enough, the lawn went brown.  He heard about Landscape Conversion Rebate Program, but did not know how it worked.

Water Efficient Garden Conversion

When he had a chance to talk to the designer, he was happy to find out everything would be taken care of from end-to-end.  Not only will they design a water efficient garden to replace the lawn, but also take care of the program application paperwork.  Hassle free – that was exactly the way he wanted.

Designing the Garden

The owner favored a natural and easy look for the garden; he also had some pebble stones from his last project, which he would like to repurpose for the new garden.

The designer decided to do a “California Native” garden.  The selection of plants showed this focus.

California Native Plants

California has many native plants, which are great for gardening.  Adapted to California’s dry and windy environment, they are hardy, strong and can thrive without any care.  There are a lot of benefits gardening with native plants:

  • Water efficient:  they do not need that much water; compared to a lawn, a garden with mostly native plants can save a significant amount of water;
  • Low maintenance: they can thrive on their own; no or little care is needed.
  • Attracting pollinators:  the bees, birds and butterflies sure like the plants that they know well for tens of thousands of years.  Those bees and birds need more food, and this will provide them.

These California Native plants are picked for this garden.

Douglas Iris:  beautiful blue iris, native to areas along west coast.

Native Plants for a Water Efficient Garden

Buckwheat: pretty small pink flowers will bloom most of the year, its nectar is the favorite of butterflies.

Monkey Flower: The full yellow blossom can be seen everywhere along the coast in spring and summer.  Some cultivars have bright red flowers, which are equally pretty.

California Poppy: the golden state flower.

CA Golden Poppy

Matilija Poppy

Native Plants for a Water Efficient Garden

The designer included the design into application materials and submitted it.  2 weeks later they received the Notice to Proceed.

Installing the Garden

All the materials were purchased.

IMG_5666_1

The brown grass was first removed.

Next was to create a miniature “nature”.  The curves for “mountains” were added, and a “river” was made with the cobble stones.

Then the piping was done, all the plants planted.  The whole area was covered with black mulch, which contrasts nicely with the river and the colors of the flowers.

WaterEfficientGarden

The California native plants: Douglas Iris, Golden Poppy, and Monkey Flower

IMG_6634

Irrigation Equipment Upgrade

Along with the lawn conversion approval, the garden also qualified for an upgrade with automatic irrigation controller and rain sensor.  Both were installed after the garden.

With the rain sensor, when it rains, it will detect and transfer the information to the controller, which will shut off the next watering scheduled.   This way the irrigation water can be saved.

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It rained right after this was installed.  It worked!

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Within a couple days, a brown lawn was successfully transformed to a beautiful water efficient garden.  The eye sore is gone, and the owner has something nice to enjoy and more to look forward to.

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Santa Clara Water District Rebate Program Second Step – Notice to Proceed

 

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In the last post on this topic, we talked about the first step of the Santa Clara Water District Landscape Conversion Rebate Program: schedule and receive a Pre-Inspection.   At the inspection, someone from the Rebate Program will inspect the yard, decide whether it qualifies for the rebates or not (Landscape Conversion Rebate, Irrigation Equipment Upgrade Rebate etc).  If yes, they will provide the rebate program application forms to be filled out and sent back.  If approved, a Notice to Proceed will be received.

Application Submission

The key information to be entered on Application Form before one can submit include:

  1. “diagram or set of plans” for the landscape.

The diagram can be a just a  sketch of the yard and where the plants will be placed.  To see some design of the gardens, see Garden Photos.

2.  plant list, each plant’s coverage value, and the total plant coverage (square feet).

To receive the rebate, the old lawn needs to be replaced  “with a minimum of 50 percent plant coverage consisting of low water using plants from the water district’s Approved Plant List. ”  For example, if the lawn’s total area is 1,000 square feet, then at least 500 square feet needs to be covered by plants from the “Qualifying Plant List” provided.

To see what some of the plants on the list are like and their coverage, visit Water Efficient Plants

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For people who are qualified to receive Irrigation Equipment Upgrade Rebate, they also should enter the info for the equipment.  For example, if the equipment approved is weather-based irrigation controller and rain sensor, one can select the products from the list provided by the Rebate Program, and fill in the make and model info on the form.  A rebate will be given for such products, along with the lawn conversion, if all the requirements are met.

Receiving Notice to Proceed

About 2-4 weeks after the application is submitted,  one may receive a Notice to Proceed from the Rebate Program.  This means the fund for the rebate is set aside, and the home owner can proceed to purchase materials and install the garden.

On the notice, it will show a “Project Completion Due Date”, which is 3 months from the date the notice is issued.  To receive the rebate, one needs to finish the project by the due date.  (It is possible to apply for and obtain an extension).

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Purchasing Materials and Getting Ready for Installment

Shopping time for plants!  Go to nurseries and buy all the plants as indicated on the application.  Pick the ones that look strongest and have the best chance to grow.  Purchase other materials too – mulch, etc.

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With all the materials, the brown lawn is ready to be converted to a beautiful water efficient garden!

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Santa Clara Landscape Rebate Program First Step – Pre-Inspection

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Got a yellow lawn and live in Santa Clara county, California?  Now is the perfect time to replace it with a water efficient garden.  Not only will you get rid of the eyesore, but also receive some rebate cash provided all the requirements are met for the new landscape.  The Santa Clara Landscape Rebate program is open now, providing $1/square feet for the lawn replacement (see full details).  Seize the opportunity and take the first step – schedule a pre-inspection.

After you call the number listed on the rebate program, the water company will schedule an appointment for you.  When the time comes, someone from the water company will show up at where the lawn is at.

Pre-Inspection 

At the pre-inspection, first, the water company person will decide which areas qualify for receiving the rebate, which ones don’t.

According to the program, “areas to be converted must include approved high water using landscape at the time of pre-inspection…In response to the drought, lawns that are dead, brown, yellow or green all qualify as long as the lawn is still physically onsite. Sites do not need to maintain a green, living lawn in order to qualify for the rebate program as long as the dead or stressed lawn was still onsite at the time of the pre-inspection and has not been removed.”

These areas qualify.  While the lawns are already brown, they are still physically on site.

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These areas do not qualify, as they have not been lawns:

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Second, the water company person will measure all the areas that qualify, and come to the “Total Irrigated Turf Square Feet”.  This is what the $1/square feet replacement rebate will be based off, provided the replacement finishes in time and meets all the requirements.

Then he showed us all the documents for the application, and went over the key items one by one.  The documents include an Application Form, a Information Packet, a Qualifying Plant List, and a W-2 Form (for the part of rebate that will qualify as personal income).

The next steps is to fill in the information required on the Application Form, mail or email it, then receive the Notice to Proceed from the water company.

Submit the Application Form

The key information to be entered on Application Form before one can submit include:

  1. “diagram or set of plans” for the landscape.

The diagram can be a just a  sketch of the yard and where the plants will be placed.  To see some design of the gardens, see Garden Photos.

2.  plant list, each plant’s coverage value, and the total plant coverage (square feet).

To receive the rebate, the old lawn needs to be replaced  “with a minimum of 50 percent plant coverage consisting of low water using plants from the water district’s Approved Plant List. ”  For example, if the lawn’s total area is 1,000 square feet, then at least 500 square feet needs to be covered by plants from the “Qualifying Plant List” provided.

To see what some of the plants on the list are like and their coverage, visit Water Efficient Plants

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Notice to Proceed

Once the application is sent, the next step is wait for the Notice to Proceed.  When it is received, the replacement project can kick off.  The project needs to be finished within 90 days from when the Notice is received, with 2 possible extensions for a total of 180 days.

This beautiful garden was one of the those that applied for the program and successfully received the rebate.

Schedule a pre-inspection now and build a great water efficient garden! Connect with us on Facebook if you have any questions.

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Santa Clara Landscape Rebate Program Open Till End of Year

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Good news for owners of single family home or other properties in Santa Clara county who want to replace their lawn – the Santa Clara Landscape Rebate program is open and accepting application now.

Per California Department of Water Resources, “outdoor landscaping is the single largest use of water in the typical California home. In most of our yards, grass consumes the most water, so reducing or eliminating how much grass we have in our landscapes can make a significant impact on the state’s water use.”

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The Santa Clara Landscape Rebate Program

To encourage the replacement of lawn with drought-tolerant landscape, some local water agencies provide a rebate program.  The Santa Clara Water District provided such a program early last year, then stopped when the funds depleted.  Now, with the arrival of new funds, the program was reinstated on July 1, 2016.

Anyone who own such properties in Santa Clara county are eligible to apply for the rebate:  “Santa Clara County single family homes, multi-family and business properties with qualifying irrigated landscape (i.e. irrigated turf or functional swimming pool) can receive rebates for replacing high water using landscape, such as irrigated turf grass, with a minimum of 50 percent plant coverage consisting of low water using plants from the water district’s Approved Plant List.”

The rebate amount for lawn replacement for a single family home is $1/square foot.  See details here

Rebate Application Procedure

The whole application process run like this:

  1.  Property owner call to schedule a pre-inspection;
  2. An inspection will be performed; if approved, the owner can submit a Request for Application Form;
  3. After the Form is submitted, receive a written Notice to Proceed;
  4.  With the Notice to Proceed, purchase materials and start the project.  Projects must be completed within 90 days of date on written Notice to Proceed.
  5. Another inspection will be performed; if all the requirements are met, the rebate will be processed and sent to the owner.

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When to Apply

Rebate applications are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. The program will end on Dec 31, 2016, which means there are only 3 months left.  Anyone interested should submit their applications as soon as possible.

The plants used for the the new landscape must be on the water district’s Approved Plant List.   Check out some the plants on the list, with their photos here

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